Monday, May 4, 2009

Easiest Quilt Ever! The Rag Quilt Tutorial

Make a cute baby quilt, a TV throw, or a warm camping blanket! These blankets are so easy to make and customize to your needs. The nice thing about these quilts is that unlike "real" quilts, they don't have to be perfect! Now that's my kind of quilt! :)

The quilt shown in this tutorial is a finished size of about 38 x 50 inches, using 8-inch cut squares. The pattern uses 48 finished squares, 6 squares x 8 squares. You can make the squares bigger or smaller, and add squares if you want the blanket to be bigger. This size is good for a baby, toddler, or small child.

For my quilts I use three coordinating flannels. I have heard that denim works too. You can use as many (or as little) different patterns of fabric as you want, but you will have to make sure that you have enough of each fabric for the number of squares used in your quilt (both sides).

Here's what you will need for a baby/toddler quilt:

2 and 2/3 yards of patterned flannel

1 and 1/3 yard of a coordinating solid flannel

1 and 1/3 yard of another coordinating flannel (try to find a stripe, plaid, or dot)
48 x 36 inch piece of Warm and Natural batting (or enough to make 48 6-inch squares)
thread (two or three colors)
scissors
rotary cutter
cutting mat
ruler
sewing machine
walking foot for your sewing machine (optional, but highly
recommended)

Instructions:

1. Cut your fabric using a mat, ruler and rotary cutter. Cut the fabric into 8-inch strips, then cut each strip into 8-inch squares. I make 8-inch squares because it maximizes my fabric; I don't have big chunks left over after cutting each square.

Note: Remember, if you have enough fabric, you can always cut your squares bigger. Just make sure that your squares are all the same size. You will also need more batting. No matter the size, you will lose 2-inches per square for seam allowance. So we are cutting 8-inch squares, but the finished product will have 6-inch squares and the excess will make up the fray in between the squares. That might be something to keep in mind. If you want your quilt to end up with 8-inch squares for instance, you will need to cut 10-inch squares.

2. Cut the Warm and Natural into squares that are 2 inches smaller than your flannel squares. In this case, cut 6-inch squares.
I find it is easier and faster to cut the Warm and Natural with scissors than with a rotary cutter. I double up the batting, draw a line using a ruler, and cut it with my scissors. Then I cut individual squares using my rotary cutter. You could also double the strips up and draw lines and cut with scissors as well.

Here is what you should have after cutting:
3. Arrange your squares in sandwiches: flannel on top and bottom (right sides out) with a square of batting centered in the middle.
If you have three fabrics, you should have double the amount of squares in one of the fabrics as the other two. That is because the patterned fabrics will be sandwiched together and the other two will be back and front to each other. So for this quilt, I will end up with all blue sandwiches, and sandwiches that are green on one side and orange on the other.
Remember if you are using stripes or plaid to arrange the pattern going the same way on all of the sandwiches. Decide if you want the stripes to be vertical or horizontal, and place them all that same way when forming sandwiches. For example, in this quilt, my truck fabric is placed horizontally.

4. Attach your walking foot to your machine. The walking foot keeps the fabric from bunching and puckering by helping it feed through the machine better. If you don't have one, sew slowly and you may need to help the fabric through by gently pulling on the back of the fabric as you sew. Walking feet can be purchased at sewing supply stores for around $20.

Thread your machine using contrasting thread. For example, I used orange to stitch onto the blue fabric, blue thread for the green fabric, and green thread for the orange fabric. Confused yet?

Thread your bobbin accordingly. For this square I am sewing, there is blue thread in the bobbin and green thread on top.
5. "Quilt" the squares together by sewing a line diagonally down each of your squares. Don't stop and cut the thread after each square; instead do a chain stitch by placing the corner of the next square and continuing to sew.
You will end up with a big long chain of squares. Cut the thread in between each square and do the same thing again, sewing a diagonal line in the opposite direction, making an X in each square.
You will now have 48 squares quilted together.
6. Arrange a row of 6 squares into a pattern making sure your horizontals and verticals are going the right way (back side too). I flip the orange/green squares every other time.
Then continue with the second row. See the pattern forming?
You might want to do this on the floor. You should end up with 8 rows.
Then you can bunch them together in order like this while you sew one row at a time. This is what I do, but whatever works for you is fine. Just make sure that they are in the right order.
7. Here's where it gets tricky. You are going to sew one row together at a time (six squares). Sew on a 1-inch seam allowance, with the seam allowance SHOWING. If it helps, you can lay your row out and pinch the fabric up where the seams would be to remember where to sew.

Here are the squares for my first row, with the first two squares sewn together. Notice the seam allowance is showing on the front side of the blanket.
Continue all the way down the row until it is finished. Make sure you sew the row so that all of the seam allowances are showing. Then finish all of the other rows one at a time.
Here is a picture of all of the rows sewn. The rows are not yet sewn together; I should have spaced them out so you could see that.
8. Now sew your rows together, still keeping the seam allowances showing on the same side. (One side of the quilt has the extra fabric for fraying and one side is flat.)
Make sure that you keep the pattern going the right way. One trick I use is to start with the bottom two rows and pinch where the seam allowance will be on top of the quilt. Then I go and sew those rows together. When I am done, I unfold it and place it back down where it goes. Then I pinch it together with the next row and so on.

One thing to keep in mind when you are sewing the rows together is to try and get the squares' seams to match up. It won't matter on the frayed side of the quilt, but you will see it on the back flat side. So if you care that they are perfect (or at least close) make sure they are matching up as you sew over them. You may need to pull the fabric one way or the other.

This is how I do it. I tuck the seam allowance on the bottom side up and let the seam allowance on the top go down. They kind of fit like a puzzle that way. I am no quilter; I don't know the correct way to do patchwork if there is one, but this seems to work for me. It won't matter which way your fabric goes, because those seam allowances are going to get cut up and frayed anyway.
The last sewing step is to sew around the entire quilt, again using a 1-inch seam allowance. You can sew completely from side to side, or start one inch inside and pivot your quilt with your needle inserted one inch from the end of that side so that it's one continuous line. You should end up with a quilt that looks something like this on the front:
...and this on the back:
9. You are almost done! Now grab a good pair of scissors and plop down in front of the TV. You are going to snip those seam allowances about every 1/4 inch. It won't matter if they are perfect. The intersections of the squares can be tricky, but it won't matter which way you cut them. I just cut along the rows, but whatever you do will be fine. Make sure you cut around the perimeter of the blanket as well.
10. And now for the easiest step of all! Wash the blanket in the washing machine. That's how you get this cute frayed up look. Make sure you clean out your lint filter before you dry it- you will have a lot of fuzz from this quilt.

And you're done! Here are some others I have made.

More questions? Check out my Rag Quilt FAQ post here!

Check out my newest rag quilt (different pattern) here!

137 comments:

  1. Great tutorial. You've been busy!

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  2. Great tutorial! I may have to try this for an upcoming baby gift!

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  3. I love those blankets. "Sew" cute and "Sew" easy!

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  4. Fun! I love rag quilts!
    Your's look awesome!!

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  5. Fabulous tutorial!! Your quilts are darling!

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  6. I'm so glad you posted this... I've always wanted to learn how to make these quilts! Yeah!

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  7. Love it. Can't wait to try it. I'm going to need to start a book with all the project I want to do!!

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  8. Thank you so much for sharing such detailed (the pictures are great) and SIMPLE instructions that make sense! I can't wait to try...

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  9. So cute . . . thanks for the very nice tutorial! I'm ready to dig into my fabric stash and make one!!

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  10. Congrats! Your quilts are lovely and I just love the easy tutorial.

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  11. This is such a great tutorial! I've been wanting to get into quilting but have been intimidated. This seems like a really easy way to start! Thanks for posting!

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  12. Thank you for taking the time to map out how to make a rag quilt and for the awesome photos. WE all learn different, this is the best tutorial I have found to give me the courage to take on my first rag quilt. I am very excited.

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  13. Thanks so much for this tutorial. This is the only one I've found so far that makes me feel like this project is something I can do! So thank you, thank you, thank you!

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  14. THANK YOU FOR SHOWING ME WHAT TO DO WITH THE FANNEL SQUARES I HAVE. I HAVE STACKS OF ALL COLORS, AND THANKS TO YOU I CAN MAKE A NICE QUILT MY GRANDKIDS WILL LIKE AND KEEP. THANK YOU VERY MUCH AUDREY

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  15. These will make great Christmas gifts!

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  16. Great tutorial! I have been thinking of doing one of these and now that I see how easy, I think I'll try it. :-)

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  17. I'm just learning to sew, and this is going to be my first big project. Thanks for sharing!

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  18. thank you...thank you...thank you! easy peasy instructions that make sense! i can't wait to start!

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  19. I've been wanting to try my first quilt and this is so cute and seems pretty easy for a beginner. One question: Do I wash my flannel before cutting and sewing?

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  20. Estelle, I do not usually wash my flannel and it hasn't made a difference. But if you feel more comfortable washing it first, that would be fine. I just throw a Shout Color Catcher into the wash when I wash the quilt so the colors won't bleed. I have never had a problem so far. Hope that helps!

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  21. I've been wanting to make one of these, with your directions I'll be sure to try one. My twin sister is making one following your directions and said it was easy.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Connie Jones

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  22. Thank you thank you thank you! You are a total life saver!!!!

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  23. Thank you for showing step by step instructions! I want to make a rag quilt as a baby gift... Didn't know how to go about it. Thank you so much!

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  24. I have finished sewing a quilt for my grandson following your dirctions exactly. (Fringing still awaits me.) In the meanwhile, I am wondering if the quilt isn't a bit too heavy. I plan to make another on, but would like to know what you and others think of omitting the battng?

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  25. I have omitted the batting before, and I didn't like it as well, but I like big cozy blankets. It will definitely work if you omit the batting. If that's your preference, I say go for it! Plus, it'll make for a cheaper quilt :)

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  26. 00000000

    I have looked all over on how to make one of these!!! Thank you sho much for showing the back side! I have always wondered about that!

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  27. Thank you very much for posting your tutorial. We planned a rag quilting group night, emailed your website out to our quilting group, and we were able to make 17 rag quilts in one evening. These quilts will be given to local foster children. Thank you once again.

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  28. I am on my second rag quilt. I love your tutorial and recommend it to anyone wanting to venture into the world of sewing.

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  29. Thanks for this tutorial!! It's so complete. I know now that I can make this myself!! :)

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  30. i am thinking about trying this....but i want a quilt to fold at the end of a queen size bed, so at least twin sized. Have you ever done this using larger squares, like starting out w 12" so the finished size would be 10"? I wonder if the problem would be that the quilting needs to be more than just an X across such a larger square..... thank you so much!

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  31. Thanks for your easy to follow instructions and pictures. I was looking for some inspiration as I promised my friend a baby cot quilt and I think I can do this one.

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  32. Susan in Charlotte: Yes, you can definitely do bigger squares! However, the biggest I have ever cut had been 9 inches. If you are concerned about only quilting an X on such a big square, I would consider just using more squares instead of cutting bigger squares. Does that make sense? Hope that helps!

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  33. This looks a lot easier than I thought! I may have to try it one day. Thanks for the great idea!

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  34. I read your instructions last night and just finished a baby size quilt.
    thanks so much for all the pictures! It helps those of us who learn by site and not reading.

    Thank you!!!
    Alison in Greenville, NC

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  35. Thank you for the time and effort. You did a wonderful job. My QUESTION is can you use any other type of fabric with this method? Just wondered. I have an aweful lot of cotton. TY

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  36. Lallyy, I have only ever used flannel, because I like the coziness of it, but my sister has made rag quilts using cotton and it turns out fine. So by all means, use up your cotton! There are a lot more possibilities with cotton; sometimes it's hard to find what you're looking for in flannel. Good luck and have fun with it!

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  37. Hi I love your tutorial and we are trying it as we speak but I have some questions. Were the x comes together in the corners which way do you cut them?... I have all four corners nestled together so are they supposed to be bunched up? One lays to the left and the other to the right. By cutting them will the fraying still come out?.. I can send you a picture if easier to understand..Thank you
    Mandy

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  38. Thanks for the tutorial. I made one and it turned out great! I posted about it on my blog. Thanks.

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  39. Thanks, lovely quilt and I will try to do one.
    Blessing
    Rosalie

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  40. I want to make quilts for a woman's shelter and this will be perfect. My question is, do I have to use the Warm and Natural batting or can I use the polyester batting with a light loft?

    Thanks!

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  41. I'm sure that you can use other batting! I have always used Warm and Natural, but I'm sure anything would be fine.

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  42. Thanks for the tutorial! Made my first one.. it's in the washer right now and I'm so excited about it! they didn't have warm and natural at the store I went to, so I ended up buying some somewhat thin fleece batting or something I can't remember exactly what it was called. It worked ok but I think for my next one I will try to find the warm and natural. I also didn't have a walking foot but think it might have been better to have.. a few of my squares had little tucks in them but you can't see them in the finished product.

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  43. Thanks VERY much for posting these wonderful and easy to follow steps!!! I am so excited to make my quilt! Although I am pretty much a beginner, your steps and pictures are so easy to follow, I have great faith in myself. Can't wait!! Thanks again.

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  44. This is such a wonderful tutorial. I was asked to teach some women how to do a rag quilt and I used your steps. I had to translate it into French, but put your blog as the source on the page. Thank you!

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  45. awesome tutorial...i actially think i can do this now

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  46. Best tutorial I've found! I started mine... very time consuming!! :) Loved your detailed instructions and pictures, thanks!

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  47. I love your detailed instructions. Especially the photos - colors are great and easy to understand. Now i am going to find the tutorial for the pillow. Great blog! Lucy

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  48. I love this! I have one question though, do you have to use flannel or can you use other kind of fabric and still get the frays to look the same?

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  49. Thank you so much! I want to make a rag quilt with cotton fabrics, but I'm afraid of clogging up my washer with strings. Does your sister wash hers in her home washer? Thanks so much for your awesome tutorial! I can't wait to make a quilt!

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  50. Awesome! Can't wait to make one :)

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  51. This is one of the best set of instructions I have found, for putting this quilt together

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  52. Great tutorial! I searched it for my question, and did not find: "Can I use this technique with Minkee fabric on top, and flannel on the bottom?" I'm thinking of deleting the batting, and the quilted X. I want to make it 60 x 10 inches.
    Hildy Kornelsen.

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  53. Sorry for the delay in response; I've been out of town. Yes, you can wash a cotton blanket in a regular washer, and yes you can use Minkee fabric. I wouldn't suggest omitting the quilted X, but you can definitely omit the batting. I think it might be really hard to keep together without quilting the squares somehow. Hope that helps!

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  54. Someone asked about other options to Warm and Natural...here in the south I find that to be too heavy...but I have always used a piece of flannel for batting instead...cut to the same size as the other squares and incorporated in the fraying...it works very well...no different sizing...I even use it when I have flannel sqaures...always X I say...although sometimes I use a pretty ivy stitch instead of straight for a baby girl! These directions are the best! And the posts from others...I learned a few things reading them! Enjoy...maybe it isn't official "quilting" but it is fun!

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  55. Thank-you for posting this wonderful tutorial.
    Inspired by your title: "Easiest Quilt Ever!" - I started to sew .... and I love the result of my first ever rag quilt.
    Just blogged pictures (with a link to your fabulous blog)
    Cheers Kris :)

    http://kristopherkdesign.blogspot.com/2010/05/shabby-raggy-soft-and-snugly-rag-quilt.html

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  56. Great tutorial - will refer others to it. I work at Fabricland in Huntsville, Ontario, Canada and some of my fellow employees are very talented quilters who also do rag quilts. I'm just making my first one and wanted to check to see how to handle the seams when sewing the rows together - which you've shown me here. Some use the Warm & Natural - which they quilt with the "X", but I'm using three layers of flannelette and others have found that because of the nap on the fabric the "X" is not necessary. The middle layer of fabric is usually a complimentary colour (that's the Canadian spelling)or it can be made to really "pop" by using a contrasting one. The middle layer adds to the fullness of the frilly affect. Some have made theirs using polar fleece. Just getting ready for our first long weekend of the summer (Victoria Day)when cottagers come in droves to Muskoka. Hope you enjoy your Memorial Day weekend next week! Will check out your other sites when my quilt is done. Thanks again for the great instructions!

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  57. Fabulous, I finished my rag quilt last week, thank you so very much for the clear instructions.

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  58. Awesome tutorial....I'm going to link this tutorial to a post on my blog on 6/7/10 if that's OK. Thanks! =]

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  59. couldn't have done it with out these awesome instructions!

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  60. Excellent Tutorial! Very simple with great pics for those of us who are visual learners. Thanks again from the ladies at www.jofabrics.com!! Oh, and ps...for all those interested in finding some really cool novelty prints for your next rag-quilt project, we have plenty! Come visit us some time!

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  61. Best tutorial I've seen for a rag quilt with very detailed steps. I am almost finished a Spongebob rag quilt. I ordered a pair of rag quilt scissors and am waiting for them to arrive in the mail before cutting. Happy quilting everyone!

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  62. I just finished making my first ever rag quilt according to these easy and clear instructions. It turned out wonderfully! Thanks so much for taking the time to post an excellent tutorial!

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  63. This was exactly the information I was looking for. Thanks so much for sharing...

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  64. This looks relatively easy (compared to other quilts!) so I'm looking forward to making it one of my projects! Thank you for sharing!
    Mira

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  65. Thank you so much--I was searching for instruction and found you! I would love to be a "follower" but couldn't find the "Become a Follower" button!

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  66. Yeah! I finally found this pattern. Thank you so much for posting!

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  67. Do you have to use batting in between the flannel, if not, would you still have to sew the X

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  68. Hi. Thanks for the great tutorial!! Just love these rag quilts. We don't use any batting in our quilts. Just 2 layers of flannel, and we use an 8 1/2" square. We don't sew an X on the squares and they wash and stay together beautifully. We like the shorter frays instead of the longer ones, so we use a 1/2" seam allowance on all seams. We also cut 1" wide lengths, folded in half and pressed, then sewed on the border edges, when frayed, gives a nice finished look, with the same thickness as the rest of the quilt. Just overlap the next piece, when adding another piece to the edge, till you're all the way around. These quilts are very warm, so you don't really have to put extra thickness in, if you don't want to. Shorter drying time, also. Thanks for the great pictures!!

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    Replies
    1. can you please explain the extra 1" on the edges. do you tuck the folded edge between the front and back pieces and then sew them with a 1/2" seam allowance? I don't understand "just overlap the next piece, when adding another piece to the edge, till you're all the way around". I thought you might have to cut them 1" shorter than your block, tuck them inside the front and back, and then stitch???

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  69. Anon, I love the idea of putting a sturdier edge around the outside! Brilliant! I will have to try that.

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  70. Great tutorial!! Love it! Just made a mini 'practice' rag quilt and boy are my fingers and hands sore from the scissors! Thanks so much for the great instructions

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  71. Thank you for the great info. I just got the first sewing machine I have had in many years..and have choosen this as my first project. I totally love these quilts! Your are amazing!

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  72. I made my first rag quilt earlier this year. It was easier than I thought! came out beautifully! now I'm gonna follow your directions, but not put a border or use batting. I think using 2 layers of flannel will be fine! Thanks for your tips! Great pictures!

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  73. I made this and LOVE it! But do you have any suggestions on the washing/drying aspect? It made a complete mess of my washer and there's fuzzy pieces all over the quilt. :( I have to have it ready for a baby shower in a week! Ideas?

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  74. Thanks for this fabulous tutorial! I can't wait to start my quilt!

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  75. Did you ever get to posting the pillow covers with the leftover squares?

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  76. thanks so much for this tutorial, made the perfect gift for my new nephew out of the receiving blankets from all the cousins! it really is so easy once you get started.

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  77. I just finished the quilt, mine was a slight bigger, 55X74, it is beautiful. My daughter called from work excited,She says: now I want to learn how to quilt, that looks like something I can do. The instructions were excellent. I am not good with patterns, but this was great. It took 21 hrs. and lots of fun. The only thing I missed was after washing, I must of snipped the joints incorrectly a few came apart. Made a pillowcase too. Oh, and doing it with in 2 days, my last 2 rows were wrong. But the funny part was I didn't notice until I posted a picture. thank you so very much, you have helped 2 people want to quilt now. Oh I used another batting also

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  78. What does the reverse side of the quilt look like?

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  79. oops, nevermind, I just saw it above. sorry

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  80. thanks! I've been wanting to try this kind!

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  81. Well! You took the intimidation right out! Thankyou so much, now I can use all my ebay squares..yae! I can't wait to start my very own rag quilt...Kelly

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  82. OMG I just found out im pregnant and will for sure make one of these for the new baby!!!! Thank you, Brooke
    I am your newest follower and hope that you will come be a follower at my blog!!! brooke
    brookedouglass@yahoo.com
    Girl Boy Girl Inspired

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  83. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  84. I'd like to try a crib blanket using flannel on the underside and poly-cotton on the top (the rag side). Should there be any problem with using a non-flannel fabric on the top side?

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  85. Thank you so much , you made making our quilt so much easier & so much fun. Huge cudo's for all your detailed work and having the pictures was awesome. Great job

    smamer@sasktel.net

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  86. I want to make a quilt but don't want something real difficult and loose interest. This looks so rich and fabulous. Directions and pictures are a great help.

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  87. gracias por tan lindo rag quilt, la informacion me sirvió de mucho, ahora estoy cortando el mio, ya deseo verlo terminado gracias

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  88. All I have is regular quilters batting. (sorry, I don't know the technical term, I was given it for free) Do you think this will work? I think I'm going to try it today, so maybe I'll let you know if it works.:D

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  89. Tiffany, it probably will work, but it might be hard to machine sew through. Try it out on one square and if it's too cumbersome, maybe consider substituting the batting for a piece of flannel. Good luck!

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  90. This is such a great tutorial! Thank you for the perfect instructions. I make a reference to your tutorial on my post/tutorial for a blanket to backpack that I created. Love to have you stop by!

    I'm a new follower. Love to have you follow me too!

    http://sunscholars.blogspot.com

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  91. Most brides want to go to the Wedding Dresses stores to pick wedding dresses.

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  92. Just wanted to let you know that I am sharing a link to this tutorial on my page. I've seen others who don't sew their "x"s all the way to the corners, and who cut the outside corners of their quilts out. I stress to everyone I show how to make a rag quilt that it is necessary to sew from corner to corner so that when you sew your quilt together the seams will lock over the "x"s and keep them from unraveling. Great tutorial.

    Angie
    Summerfield Quilts
    http://sfquilts.blogspot.com/
    http://sfquilts.com

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  93. Will fleece fabric have the same ruffled effect as flannel on the edges, where you cut into it?

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  94. This looks fantastic! It looks easy up to the finishing touches! lol I will give it a go although I'm sure it wont look anywhere near as good as yours!

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  95. Finally, a picture of how to do it! Thank you for these easy to follow instructions and pictures. I am going to try this for my daughter's first baby, my first grandchild. Very nice, thanks again!

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  96. I can't over how easy this was I started it yesteray and am just aboutfinished with it. It goes together so fast and looks so great. Thank you so much for the easy to instrution and the pics help so much. Going to the store on fri to see what other colors I can make lots of grand kids. and what a great XMas present. thank again

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  97. I've been looking for a good site to show me how to do this. I have a little girl who LOVES blankets. So i wanna make a camo and pink one for her for her birthday. Im gonna give it a try :D. And i like how you explained your steps and showed great pictures! Thank you lots!

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  98. Just the gift idea I need for my new great-grandson who is due the end of October. It's cute and simple and I can finish it in plenty of time. Instructions are great and the pictures give me confidence. Comments also give good info. Thank you!

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  99. I have purchased 2-2/3 yards of a 100% cotton flannel print and each of the 1-1/3 yard pieces in a 100% cotton quilting fabric. Now I'm wondering whether the flannel will shrink more than the quilting cotton and make a warped or twisted-look quilt. What do you think? Should I pre-wash all the fabrics before cutting? Or should I use all flannel or all quilting cotton?

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  100. Thank you for this tutorial...I have never made a quilt & haven't been sewing very long but I so love this quilt style. I was wondering if you could tell me how much material I would need to do a queen size quilt like this. Like how many yards of fabric and/or squares I will need....THANKS again!
    Kristy

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  101. yes, i too would like to know how to figure hoe much fabric to buy? guess it would depend on size you are making. and what size sq.you use!? i would like a bigger sq. than shown say i would like full size with 8 1/2 sq. can you help?
    thanks sewjoy

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  102. HELLO!
    I've had this site bookmarked and have looked back MANY times during my first RAG QUILT project. So far, so good....I am at the "snipping" part. (pre-snipping nerves here) but I used an 8 1/2 inch flannel square w/ 6 inch batting square between and it turned out GREAT.....it's a BIG, OVERSIZED throw but will be so warm....it's my best friends Christmas gift this year. THANK YOU SO MUCH for your site....as soon as I finish this quilt I am making one for ME.

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  103. I made one using your awsome tutorial, check it out: http://www.flickr.com/photos/laceylady/6461472041/

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  104. Wonderful tutorial!! I had made a rag quilt a couple of years ago, but needed some direction on putting the squares together, so turned to the Web and found your tutorial! Just what I needed. Thank you!!!

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  105. Thanks for sharing your knowledge. You should post a video on u tube!!

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  106. Thanks for the great tutorial. I've been wanting to make one of these for ages - all your tips were a great help. Here is my finished quilt:

    http://bunchesandbits.blogspot.com/2012/01/baseball-fun-bucket.html

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  108. I am about to begin my first flannel ragged quilt.... I have made patchwork quilts, but not this kind yet. Thank you for such a thorough tutorial plus photos !!

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  109. how long does it take to back stich a childs cot quilt, care bears and highly detailed, thick material, roughly 38 x 51, for a fast sewer? just an approximate guess is all im wondering, thank you.

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  110. Awesome instructions! Very easy to follow. I have made a few for gifts

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  111. love love love this quilt and can't wait to make one when i have a study break

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  112. is there anyway to do this with out the frill edges?

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  113. I am going to make one of these for my granddaughter. Thanks for the detailed instuctions. Do you put a one inch seam around the outside also where you have to cut the fringe?

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  114. This is so perfect. I started making one today and got all the squares cut. Tomorrow its time to start sewing. Im expecting my first child and am so very excited to finish this up for her <3

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  115. I came here to try my hand at rag blankets since I saw how adorable they were in a book and again at a quilt shop. Flannel is awesome, I love it so much for its warmth and softness. What began as making one for a grandchild, quickly turned to 1 for each. I must confess though, after the first blanket, I loved it so much I had to make one of my own. I made it much bigger of course with matching pillow cases to boot. Your tutorial was very helpful in this endeavor. If you are ever interested in seeing the finished product you helped me create come by.. http://www.flickr.com/photos/77215144@N03/s

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  116. Connie, thank you very much for the tutorial, it is really fabulous & inspired me to make a rag quilt, I had seen other tuts but got a bit mixed up with them lol. I'm halfway through making one in denim, thanks to you. I loved seeing everyone's pics as well, greetings from Ireland to you all. :)

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  118. I just finished and will be washing the quilt soon. Just wondering if it's washed too often, will it eventually ravel into the seams? I made this one in baby blues and white for my grandson will be arriving in August. We live in the deep south, and it's very hot here, so I opted for cotton fabric with light, low profile, polyester batting. Hope it will ravel ok. I did the main squares in white with light blue polka dots, and coordinated with light blue stripes and solid white. The white is a light seersucker type fabric. I'd love to send a picture -- would that be ok?

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  119. Oh - I also wanted to tell you that the tutorial was awesome, very easy to follow. It was the most fun sewing project I've ever done. I know I will make more of these!

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  120. I used your tutorial and made a beautiful rag quilt for a baby shower. It turned out great and it was very easy to follow.

    Thanks so much for your help!

    Dana

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  121. I LOVE this. I'm not the world's best sewer, but I love it and am always looking for little simple projects. Also, being a mom - time just isn't something I have a lot of these days, so anything that I can save a little time on without skirting around a quality end product and I can't WAIT to try this one! Stepping up my game a tad from halloween costumes!

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  122. Olá! Estou fazendo uma colcha de retalhos e vim conferir suas dicas e me inspirar para concluí-la.
    Abraço e parabéns pelo seu trabalho e pelo seu blog!

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  123. You had previously mentioned that you would do a tutorial for a matching pillow case with the extra fabric. I don't see it anywhere, has it been done? If so, can you please advise where it is? Thanks!!

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  124. Thanks so much for the tutorial. I have been following it with great success. Your pictures and descriptions are very articulate and easy to follow.

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  125. why oh why?????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  126. Thank you so much for this great tutorial! Your directions were easy to follow and helped me make my first quilt. So fun and easy! Thanks again! :)

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  127. OMG this is THE BEST rag quilt tutorial I have seen.... thanks!!!! Going to start my own rag quilt this weekend, with the help of this post!!

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  128. I've taught myself how to quilt...some instructions are difficult to understand...your tutorial was amazingly easy to understand and follow....Thank You

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  129. Thank you for this amazing tutorial!! I love rag quilts, and I'm dying to try one! I love making quilts and blankets for donation, and this one will be quick, easy, and incredible!! THANK YOU!!

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  130. I used a wave cutter on the edges instead of the straight cuts, and with the polar fleece, if you do the cuts and then pull gently on the ends they curl up and make like a fringe!

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  131. Wow I have been wanting to try one of these thanks so much for the tutorial, I can't wait to try it, you make it look easy LOL

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  132. Out of ALL the tutorials on the web I used yours, I would love for you to take a look ;) Thanks for taking time to put this out there!
    xoxo melzie
    http://melziesmonologue.blogspot.com/2013/08/tgifff-1st-rag-quilt-finish.html

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  133. thanks so much....so helpful.

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